What We Hunt

Arizona Quail:
Gambel's & Scaled Quail | 2019/2020 dates TBA | Limit: 15 per day & 45 in possession

Mearns' Quail | 2019/2020 dates TBA | Limit: 8 per day & 24 in possession

Dove| 09/01/2019-09/15/2019 | Limit: 15 per day 45 possession

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Minnesota Ruffed Grouse & Woodcock:

 

Ruffed Grouse| Sept 14th 2019 - Jan 1st 2020| Limit: 5 per day & 10 in possession

Woodcock| Sept 21 2019 - Nov 4th 2019| Limit: 3 per day & 9 in possession

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South Dakota Pheasant and Prairie Birds

Pheasant| Oct 19th 2019 - Jan 5th 2020 | Limit: 3 roosters per day & 15 in possession

Sharp-Tails & Prairie Chickens| Sept 21st 2019 - Jan 5th 2020| Limit: 3 per day & 15 in possession

Hungarian Partridge| Sept 21st 2019 - Jan 5th 2020| Limit: 5 per day & 15 in possession

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Click here to purchase your SD tribal license

Kansas Turkey

 

Rio Grande Turkey (archery)| 2019/2020 dates TBA| Limit: 2 per season, Gobblers only

Rio Grande Turkey (shotgun)| 2019/2020 dates TBA| Limit: 2 per season, Gobblers only

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Gambel's Quail
Gambel's Quail

The Gambel's jaunty, plumed topknot (carried by both sexes) makes for ready identification along with the males bright russet cap, black face and bib, and cream-colored belly marked with a black horseshoe. As with all species of quail, the young of the year can be distinguished through their first winter by their spotted secondary wing coverts. Adult males average only about 6 ounces; the slightly smaller females between 5.7 and 5.9 ounces.

Mearns Quail
Mearns Quail

Males have white and black harlequin-marked heads, capped by a russet shock of feathers that form an ill-fitting crest. These cock quail also possess handsome brown and black checkered backs interlaced with white darts, and white-spotted black flanks similar to a guinea fowl's. Their breasts and underparts are rich mahogany that turns to black at the rump, which terminates in a stubby, almost non-existent tail. The hens are cinnamon with brown, black and buff markings.

Scaled Quail
Scaled Quail

Both sexes of this species display white, conical crests, hence the common name of "cotton top." The Scaled appellation is appropriate, however, the birds possess a distinctive scalloping on the breast, nape, and belly. Otherwise, their overall color is tan above with a mixture of beige, grays, and whites below. A generally bigger bird than the Gambel's quail, adult male "scallies" average about 7.3 ounces, females 6.7 ounces.

Ruffed Grouse
Ruffed Grouse

These chunky, medium-sized birds weigh from .99-1.65 lbs, measure from 40 to 50 cm in length, and span 50-64 cm across their short, strong wings. Ruffed grouse have two distinct morphs: grey and brown. In the grey morph, the head, neck, and back are grey-brown; the breast is light with barring. Brown-morph birds have tails of the same color and pattern, but the rest of the plumage is much more brown, giving the appearance of a much more uniform bird.

American Woodcock
American Woodcock

The brown-mottled American Woodcock walks slowly along the forest floor, probing the soil with its long bill in search of earthworms. Unlike its coastal relatives, this plump little shorebird lives in young forests and shrubby old files across eastern North America. Its cryptic plumage and low-profile behavior makes it hard to find except in the springtime at dawn or dusk, when the males show off for the females by giving loud, nasal "peent" calls and performing dazzling aerial displays.

Ring-necked Pheasant
Ring-necked Pheasant

Found across open fields and weedy roadsides in the U.S. and southern Canada. Males sport iridescent copper-and-gold plumage, a red face, and a crisp white collar. Their rooster-like crowing can be heard from up to a mile away. The brown females blend in with their field habitat. Introduced to the U.S. from Asia in the 1880's, pheasants quickly became one of North America's most popular upland game birds. Watch for them along roads or bursting into flight from brushy cover.

Hungarian Partridge
Hungarian Partridge
Sharp-tail Grouse
Sharp-tail Grouse

Sharptail grouse and Prairie Chicken

Rio Grande Turkey
Rio Grande Turkey

Four feet tall, and alternating color patterns